https://hmlandregistry.blog.gov.uk/2017/11/07/weve-released-hm-land-registry-data-free-charge/

We've released more HM Land Registry data free of charge

Here at HM Land Registry, we have an ambition to become the world’s leading land registry for speed, simplicity and an open approach to data. As Head of Data, I’m especially focused on the last of these. We’ve set ourselves a significant challenge to release all the data we can feasibly publish, over the next three years.

Our data team has already started working towards this goal. Today, we went live with the first of many data releases planned for the next three years. Our Commercial and Corporate Ownership (CCOD) and Overseas Companies Ownership (OCOD) datasets were released free of charge for the first time.

These datasets contain information on properties, where the registered legal owner is a UK company, a corporate body or an overseas company. We expect these datasets will become popular with a variety of customers, for a range uses.

As the custodian of the Land Register, we are obliged to safeguard the information it contains, to prevent fraud or misuse. To ensure users of CCOD and OCOD don’t use the data to harm others or breach their privacy rights, we have implemented a registration process. This process includes the acceptance of licence terms and identity verification.

While this means that the data isn’t fully open, it does enable us to release the data free of charge. This removes a significant cost barrier that has hindered citizens, entrepreneurs and small and medium-sized companies from using the datasets. For us it is all about getting the balance right; by taking this approach we can ensure that we are safeguarding part of the Critical National Infrastructure but also meeting our ambition to make our information as open as possible.

As we continue to publish new data we may have to apply similar registration processes to other datasets, to safeguard against fraud. In the coming months, we will publish our roadmap for future data releases; this will describe the datasets we’re considering releasing. It will also show the extent of our open data ambition, which I think you will find impressive, and allow you to feedback your priorities.

64 comments

  1. Comment by Philip Mullard posted on

    Would like to know all owned properties by family surname of Tavre
    Would be trulely grateful.

    Reply
  2. Comment by NT posted on

    It would be great if it didn't cost money to search the land registry, effectively a big DB of documents. Slap it into ElasticSearch and allow full text and metadata search at will, effectively taking this 1860s filing cabinet into the 1950s.

    Maybe you could even expose a nice web interface with alerting around properties, and NLP based parsing of titles and charges-- but that might require a developer or two.

    I'm bitter because it should not cost 3 quid to run a lookup, which is required to prove ownership of a property. It's a pointless charge that makes accessing data that much more irritating and difficult. Some of the fancier searches cost even more. It's ridiculous. Data should be open and free, especially when it's required by the public and paid for by the public.

    Reply
    • Replies to NT>

      Comment by Tom posted on

    • Replies to NT>

      Comment by Louise posted on

      Incredulous that in affect we 'the public" whatever situation you may be in,cannot access this information to veiw,I'm personally having problems that will affect mine and my children's life's, also now my grandchildren, in a way that affects all our social structures, I've been telling my children that good an right when things seem bad are the path to stay on,which in my veiw is lost these days in our young,I've lived in all aspect's of life and want to believe what I tell them is correct.I just needed a place to start so's to address the situation,the right way x

      Reply
  3. Comment by Shela posted on

    When it says boundary, is that from your front door, or the end of your front garden ( that would make it from your front gate)

    Reply
    • Replies to Shela>

      Comment by AdamH posted on

      Sheta - from a registration perspective the boundary is shown by a red outline on the title plan.

      Reply
  4. Comment by Sheila posted on

    Can I search to find my mortgage lender circa 1981-1986 on a particular property and if so could you provide a link?

    Reply
  5. Comment by Linda James posted on

    I don't have a hard copy of my lease. My conveyancer said the original was sent to the land registry. How can I get a copy? Appreciate your help

    Reply
  6. Comment by Natasha posted on

    I'm in the process of buying a house, so I have bought a title plan of that property just to see exact size of the garden etc.
    I'm very confused at the moment as on the title plan size of the garden is more smaller. It actually shows that half of the garden is belongs to another property.
    I do not know what to do, of course I will request all related documents from vendor, solicitor but I would like to check it by myself as I don't want someone in the future to come and say it is my garden.
    Thank you.

    Natasha

    Reply
    • Replies to Natasha>

      Comment by AdamH posted on

      Natasha - the title plan will only show what that title includes. If the land is not included then you should query it with the selelr and in some cases you may find that the other land is registered under a separate title. The title plan won't tell you that the additional land belongs to another property - the black lines may imply that but they are simply survey lines denoting where a fence, hedge etc may have been when the area was sureveyed. They do not denote ownership

      Reply
  7. Comment by Steve H posted on

    Adam H,

    I am in the process of purchasing a property. We have a dispute over the title plans. The property I'm buying appears not to own all the land as advertised. some of this land supposedly is owned under another title However, the title in question only has a deed on the HM website but no title plan ? where can I find the title plan if it is not on your website ?

    Reply
  8. Comment by Kate Lloyd posted on

    Hi
    We are trying to establish when an extension was added to a property that we are selling. Is it possible to view old title deed info to see when the extra room was shown?

    Reply
    • Replies to Kate Lloyd>

      Comment by AdamH posted on

      Kate - in my experience it is very unlikely that any registered details would confirm when an extra room was added unless it involved a lease and the extra room triggerd a variation of that lease. We register the land and it's general boundaries and as such the plans do not change when an extra room is built or a building is erected or demolished for example. The boundaries do not change.
      I would suggest trying Ordnace Survey to see if their maps show a change and at what time. The alternative is the local planning authority to see whether planning permission was granted and if so when

      Reply
  9. Comment by Margaret Lamont posted on

    I need to find out if I have an easement or implied easement to repair my water supply pipe where it runs through another's garden. What searches do I need please?

    Reply
  10. Comment by Zwickl posted on

    I’m tried to do a search against my parents property but the search result in no titles being found. My parents bought the house in 1974, I have the conveyance documents but there is not a title reference number contained. How do I get the title reference number in order to submit a DJP?

    Reply
    • Replies to Zwickl>

      Comment by AdamH posted on

      Zwicki - it reads as if it is unregistered. Our PG 1 section section 8 lists the dates on which areas became subject to compulsory registration. If their purchase deed, the conveyance, is dated prior to the relevant date for the area then that would confirm it. The PG explains how an application can then be made for first registration https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/first-registrations

      Reply
  11. Comment by Zwickl posted on

    Adamh - Thanks, section 8 shows compulsory registration coming in Nov 1986. This section seems to imply only a conveyancer can do this. My situation is a bit complex as I am POA for my mother who is joint property owner where 2nd owner is deceased (I have all the paperwork). Can I complete first registration & at the same time as doing a DJP or does a conveyancer have to do this?

    Reply
    • Replies to Zwickl>

      Comment by AdamH posted on

      Zwicki - as that is after 1974 the property should be unregistered so the deeds are crucial. Form DJP is only used for a registered title so please ignore that form. If the property is to be registered you cna do it yourself but I would always recommend using a coneyancer as they are familiar with the forms, process and what deeds/evidence should be submitted

      Reply
  12. Comment by NeilR posted on

    To be clear, obtaining some basic data for land registry ownership is not "free of charge" and costs £3.

    Reply
    • Replies to NeilR>

      Comment by AdamH posted on

      NeilR - the data you are referring ot is the registered informaiton, namely register or title plan. This article refers to specific data which is available for free.

      Reply
  13. Comment by suhaila posted on

    Is it possible for me to find out which boundary fence I am responsible for

    Reply
  14. Comment by Amanda posted on

    There is a large tree in a field behind a house which i have just purchased which needs shortening the tree i believe is past our boundary and the council are saying the land does not belong to them.how do i find out who owns the tree?

    Reply
  15. Comment by Martin posted on

    I have the Title No. to a plot of land that i would like to know who owns it, is there any other way apart from purchashing the title deeds for current ownership ?

    Reply
  16. Comment by Rufus Herring. posted on

    "Here at HM Land Registry, we have an ambition to become the world’s leading land registry for speed, simplicity and an open approach to data."

    The simple fact that HMLR charge for access to the Land Registry, which is or should be public information means that it is as far from an "open approach" and "simplicity" as possible. The only way to achieve this would be to place the entire LR database of title deeds and a facility to search the index map online free of charge and instantaneously. To state what you have without this is frank hypocrisy.

    Reply
    • Replies to Rufus Herring.>

      Comment by Anju Verma posted on

      Rufus, thanks for your comment.

      Our ambition is to be the world’s leading land registry for speed, simplicity and an open approach to data. We understand the potential value our information has to the economy. Property information can be combined with other types of data for all kinds of useful information and new services. As mentioned in our Business Strategy.

      Our data experts are finalising our data release roadmap which will detail how we will be releasing as much information as we can from our register by 2020, building on the open data we already provide. It is not just about releasing data but we are also looking at data quality, cross-government collaboration and supporting PropTech start-ups.

      We will continue to give updates about our future data plans.

      Kind Regards,
      Anju - Senior Communications Officer, HM Land Registry

      Reply
  17. Comment by Anne Poole posted on

    We bought a house in January 2018 where part of the garden and garage at the back had been sold off some time before. That portion of land is lying unused and rather derelict. We wondered how to find our whether the buyer at that time now would sell it back to us. How can we find out who that was?

    Reply
  18. Comment by Davem posted on

    Is it possible to find if a property is leasehold or freehold ?

    Reply
  19. Comment by Diane Furlong posted on

    I live in a council house Halton Housing Trust, 2 separate front gardens, with 1 access paved pathway to access both houses. Is my garden still classed as 'Shared'. As my Landlord states, because they have been dealing with Systemic ASB from my neighbours for 9 years now, and appear to be back peddling saying our gardens are shared. Which they are not. Just access gate. My address is 180 Milton Avenue, widnes, Cheshire, wa87bq

    Reply
  20. Comment by Kazim posted on

    Hi, I have a staircase to make a 2 flat converted property built on a common alleyway going back about 14years. Now the neighbour is claiming half the alleyway to build a wall in the middle. Don’t I get some sort of immunity to the staircase after so many years that the neighbour wants to bring down the staircase?

    Reply
    • Replies to Kazim>

      Comment by ianflowers posted on

      Kazim - Hi. Planning regulations may come in to play here which wall fall under the responsibility of the local authority. As to claiming the land itself, this is a very complex area and you may also need to consider any rights that exist over the common area. Ultimately, you want to consider getting independent legal advice from Citizen's Advice or from a conveyancer, such as a solicitor.

      Reply
  21. Comment by Dom posted on

    Hi, can you search for the owner on a piece of land by the title number?

    Reply
  22. Comment by Richard Searle posted on

    I ordered a title plan for a property, but the online title plan delivered from the land registry is for a property next to the one I ordered, and not the one I requested.

    Reply
  23. Comment by Dave Preston posted on

    Will it be possible in the foreseeable future to search an online map for who owns land? It is the land owner's responsibility to maintain footpaths, hedges, remove rubbish etc. but how do I found out who the owner is?

    Reply
    • Replies to Dave Preston>

      Comment by ianflowers posted on

      Dave - if the land is registered with us, you can already search a map online which may allow you to identify the land and get the ownership information you need. If the land is not registered, we will not hold any ownership information.

      Please see https://www.gov.uk/search-property-information-land-registry . Once you are on the Find a Property page, as your search relates to a piece of land, I would suggest you select the Map enquiry option. Use a nearby road / town name to search, and once you get a map of the area, change the options at the top of the map from Ordnance Survey Map to Birds Eye View. This should enable you to search the land you are interested in more clearly.

      Once you have identified the land concerned, zoom in on the map until you are able to use the 'Find properties' button on bottom left corner of the map. Click on the area that you are interested, which if the land is registered with us, will then list details of land / property information available.

      Once you decide which one you require and click Purchase, you will then need to register yourself as a new user. You will require a valid email address and a password for this.

      Register yourself as a user and then follow the process for payment. Once the payment has gone through, the title register or title plan that you have purchased will be available in PDF format for you view. You will need to save the document on your equipment if you wish to retain it for future reference.

      I hope this helps.

      Reply
  24. Comment by Freddie Stokes posted on

    The house next door to us is unoccupied and a birthday card containing money has been delivered there because the send got the house number wrong how can I find the name and address if the owner?

    Reply
  25. Comment by Denise Tyrrell posted on

    Hi
    I had a visit today from the Highways agency. Our neighbour had reported the down pipe that is attatched to both our houses.Leaking during heavy rain. We are in the middle of a block of 6 terraced houses served by 2 down pipes. The one on our house is serving 4 of these properties.
    We have been told it is our responsibility to repair the down pipe & it will cost us between £500 - £800, if the pavement needs to be dug up.
    I am not convinced it is only ours to repair. The water is coming from the neighbours guttering that has rusted.
    How can I get a copy of my deeds for my mortgaged house?
    Will it show who is responsible for the down pipe?
    Thank you

    Reply
    • Replies to Denise Tyrrell>

      Comment by AdamH posted on

      Denise - you can check the registered title(s) online/by post https://www.gov.uk/get-information-about-property-and-land - such details may refer to specific rights/provisions but I'm afraid you would have to check as we don;t offer a 'checking' service and conveyancing will vary from property to property so much depends on what was put in place previously. If there is no specific mention then it may be something to discuss and agree with your neighbours and to get legal advice upon

      Reply
  26. Comment by James posted on

    I own a flat in a development where some people have freehold shares with voting rights and others don't. I've been offered the chance to buy a voting share - how canI register the deed when it has been executed.

    Many thanks
    James

    Reply
    • Replies to James>

      Comment by AdamH posted on

      James - deeds apportioning shares of this type are not registered on the land register. They are a separate matter between you and the other shareholders/freeholder company/association

      Reply
  27. Comment by Jennifer Wilson posted on

    Covenant on Land Registry docs says ' maintain fences or hedges on the North and South sides respectively. ' Note below says ' The Northern and Southern boundaries of the land in this title do not form the north and south sides referred to ' does anyone know what this means?

    Reply
    • Replies to Jennifer Wilson>

      Comment by AdamH posted on

      Jennifer - if that is the complete wording then it means that specific covenant does not affect the land in the title. This type of personal covenant can often be caught up with restrictive covenants so in this case it has been included and the Note added to explain how it does not affect

      Reply
      • Replies to AdamH>

        Comment by Jennifer posted on

        So in my ignorance does this mean we are responsible for fences on both sides?

        Reply
        • Replies to Jennifer>

          Comment by AdamH posted on

          Jennifer - it simply means that the covenant does not affect that title so adds nothing with regards what you may or be responsible for. The register is not the sole information to be considered re such matters so you should also account for what you/the neighbours have done previously as well for example

          Reply
  28. Comment by Jennifer posted on

    Yes it is in the schedule of restrictive covenants. The actual fence that is in situ is within the boundary of the bungalow next door. Fence ownership always seems to be an issue. This restrictive covenant is conytained in the Conveyance dated 1 June 1920 and seems to relate to the purchase of the land. The house in question was not built until 1973. The bungalow next door was built before this and the fence was already there.

    Reply
    • Replies to Jennifer>

      Comment by ianflowers posted on

      As mentioned by my colleague, the title register does not appear to add anything here, and even if it did, it does really come down to discussion between neighbours to agree a way forward. The points you have made seem to indicate you feel the fence is the responsibility of your neighbour. However, where an agreement cannot be reached, ultimately these issues may need to decided in other jurisdictions such as the courts, which most parties are obviously keen to avoid given the costs involved.

      Reply
  29. Comment by Pippa posted on

    I am going round in circles trying to find the title number for a small parcel of agricultural land that we own. My mother's solicitor handled everything but never passed it on. Any suggestions as to how I do this? Thanks

    Reply

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